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    COL EDDIE M PILAPIL INF (GSC)PA
    Commanding Officer 191st MPBN, HHSG, PA

         The 191st Military Police Battalion is mandated to perform its mission to enforce military laws and orders to all military personnel working in the organization in order that the army is distinct from other group of people because of discipline, provide security to all local and foreign dignitaries, VIPs in and out the HPA complex and custodial management to all the detainees in support to the mission of HHSG, Philippine Army.



    HISTORY

                 The Military Police organization was able to write a long and remarkable history that could be traced as early as the 1930’s. And since it’s inception up to the 1970’s, the term Military police is synonymous to the Provost Marshall. As such, these can be no discussion about the Military police without discussing as well the Provost Marshal. Back then, the Provost Marshal is the most senior Military Police Officer of the Command.
    In 1936, the first Provost Marshal General was MGen Jose delos Reyes when the Constabulary became a division of the Philippine army while continuously discharging it’s normal police duties

    POST WAR
                The Military Police Command after the war is essentially a post-liberation version of the Philippine Constabulary whose time-honored name was still sullied by its unfortunate association with the Japanese Bureau of Constabulary. The Unit was trained under Military Police programs with the primary mission similar to the prewar Constabulary WITH JURISDICTION OVER THE CIVILIAN POPULACE to include the enforcement of the Military Law and Order.
                In 1945, following the surrender of Japan, Military Police units existed in most places in the country as the only unit of the Armed Forces of the Philippine- most others having been deactivated. In Luzon, three Military Police Battalions were activated from the Philippine Army and were trained as MP units distinctive from the Military Police Command. These were then attached to US Army installations and bases. By 1953, a total of eight (8) MP units composed of:
                 Three (3) – Air Police Companies from the three (3) Philippine Air Forces bases.
                 Two (2) – Area MP Companies of the First and Second Military Areas
                 One (1) – MP section of GHQ, AFP
                 303rd MP Company and 202nd MP Company of the Philippine Army.
                 Were already organized and existing-all without upper level guidance, uncoordinated in their activities and hampered by lack of doctrine and serious personnel problems.
                In 1954, The 303rd MP Company was attached to the Officer of the Provost Marshal and was commanded by the Provost Marshal General, AFP with jurisdiction over Manila area while the MP units of the major services limited in their activities within the posts.

    MARSHAL LAW ERA
                      The Martial Law years ushered the creation of composite Military Police Battalion, AFP was organized in 1973 with jurisdiction over Greater Manila area. A year after, the creation of the 2nd Composite Military Police Battalion, AFP with jurisdiction over Zamboanga City, Cebu City and Jolo followed.
                      In 1975, the Composite MP Brigade, AFP was organized to control the two Composite MP Battalions and was headed by ---, The Provost Marshal General, AFP.

    1980'S ONWARDS
                The 202nd MP Command was previously based at the concessionaire area of the old Fort Bonifacio. They were jokingly called “Pulis Paranaque” due to the vast area being covered from the former Fort Bonifacio Gate 1 in Brgy CEMBO, Makati City to Gate 3 at vicinity Bonifacio Naval Staion.
                After the 1989 coup d’etat, the unit was dissolved and eventually became the provisional unit 909th MP Company and the 08th Custodial Company to GO Nr 312 HPA dated 16 June 1990.
                In 1991, pursuant to GO Nr 511 HPA dated 16 June 909th MP Company and the 808th Custodial Company were merged into a regular unit called the Military Police Battalion. They were then based at the current Division Admin Detachment site war Southern Police District and covering the areas from old St. Ignatius Chapel, Makati City to old Gate 3, of the Philippine Navy of the Fort Bonifacio Complex.
                By 1998, the unit was then renamed 191st Military Battalion, HHSG, PA pursuant to para 2 GO Nr 654 HPa dated 15 June 1998. The unit transferred its headquarters at vicinity of the current Security and escort Battalion on 1999 with jurisdiction over the 103 Hectares Retention Area of the fort Bonifacio.
                Today, there exists a total of one (1) Battalion, 3 companies and 6 (based on size) platoons of MP units within the Philippine Army and just like in 1953, they remain to be uncoordinated in their activities and hampered by lack of doctrine.

    HISTORY OF THE LANYARD

                The most distinct part of the Military Police unit is the lanyard or simply the white cord, which identifies the Military Police from other soldiers from a distance. Its history and known origin is as diverse as the colorful history of the Military Police.

                The origin of the white lanyard has its practical beginning, significant function, and legend as well. The practical use of the lanyard is to secure the most important parts of the Military Police uniform, the whistle and the pistol. The whistle being used as of today is far different from the original traditionally used in lanyards, its practical use to secure the pistol never changed. It is customary, by virtue of tradition, that only officers or persons with authority have the right to carry a pistol that is secured by a lanyard from being lost. The lanyard practically became associated to people with authority.

                The significant use the lanyard as a significant symbol of authority first came to be known when Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte first used the lanyard as a ceremonial part of a royal uniform when he came to power in France. The lanyard attained a significant symbol of authority, thus the color and material also indicated power. From a simple fiber material, gold and gold like material became a must to indicate the importance of the person using such lanyard.

                On the other hand, the lanyard also bears a bloody and horrible symbol of great responsibility when naval personnel protecting admirals used the lanyard as a reminder of their great responsibility. The lanyard and its significant length tied around the shoulders of the persons protecting the admiral reminds them that the same lanyard will be used to hang them if any evil will befell upon the life of the admiral they are protecting.

                Even the position of the lanyard at the shoulders of the aide-camps indicates either the person they are serving is a civilian occupying high positions or military generals. Lanyards on the left shoulders indicates that the aide is serving a high ranking civilian while lanyards worn on the right shoulder indicates that the person being protected is a general of the army or an admiral in a naval force. The only thing that remained ornamental with the lanyard is the naval whistle attached to its end minus the pistol.

                Legend of Greek origin also indicates that the lanyard is also a symbol of pride, honor, and courage. It is said that when the Greek city states were being attacked by Persians, there was a Greek race that always run away from battle. In order to distinguish and identify the coward race, they were ordered by the king to wear a white dull cord similar to a lanyard. The said cord became a symbol of cowardly conduct until one day because of shame; the said race did its best and fought a bloody battle at Marathon against the Persians. The Greek king ordered the   removal of the cord but it is said that the coward Greek race requested that the cord to remain and instead a knife be attached to its end. As a reward the king allowed them to wear the cord as a reminder of such courageous act while the knife will be used to end their life if they should fail to protect their king and honor. The cord that was once a symbol of being a coward became a symbol of honor and courage.

                The lanyard’s color white symbolizes purity and neutrality. Clean and unblemished, the white lanyard/ cord symbolized impartiality and fairness in dealing with people. Even from a far, the white lanyard indicates pure intention.

                The Philippine Army’s Military Police use of the white lanyard indicates the great responsibility to protecting, serving, and defending the institution they swore to protect. The white lanyard reminds every MP’s to remain faithful to their sworn duty of protecting the Army, defending the institution, and serving the people. Attached to such lanyard is the symbol of his authority the pistol.

                The symbolic, traditional, and practical use of the lanyard indicated that it became an indispensable reminder to every Military Police wearing it the crucial duty of protecting the Army and the people as its mandate. The lanyard is a reminder that the failure to perform one’s duty means the loss of one’s honor, life, and the very essence of its existence-duty.


    UNIT SEAL/LOGO & COLOR SYMBOLISM

    Majestic Philippine Eagle Overseeing - a fortress symbolizing the command and leadership of the Philippine Army

    MP’s might of power and authority - represented by its common weapon the Cal. 45 pistol and handcuffs 

    The Three Star - represent the MP’s responsibilities over the AFP’s branch of service and its deployment across the archipelago

     


     

    MISSION
    To conduct security and render military honors in support to HHSG mission.

    VISION

    To become a better, more responsive, more dynamic, more capable and more professional law enforcement unit of the Philippine Army.

    FUNCTIONAL AREAS

    • Area Security and Operations (Base Defense, Force Protection, VIP Protective Detail, etc.)
    • Maneuver and Mobility Support Operations (Convoys Escorts, etc.)
    • Law and Order Operations (Law Enforcement, Traffic Control Management, Investigations, etc.)
    • Internment and Resettlement Operations (Custodial Management, POW Handling, Refugees Resettlement, etc.)
    • Police Intelligence Operations Terrorism and Anti-Crimes and Liaising with other Law Enforcement Agencies


    UNIT CAPABILITIES

    • Provide security to all vital installations, facilities, high-profile personnel and critical assets of the philippine army.
    • Conduct military operations in urban terrain (mout) for base defense operation.
    • Enforce military laws, post rules and regulation, maintain order, discipline inside post.
    • Traffic control and management inside post.
    • Military police operations (intelligence & investigation).
    • Provide mobility support and route security during troop and supply movement.
    • Perform custodial supervision and confinement of military detainees.
    • Control stragglers and civilian refugees.assist in man-made or natural disaster relief operations.


    UNIT SPECIFIC TASK

    • Enforce military laws, post rules and regulations.
    • Control traffic and movement of individual inside post.
    • Physical security of camp gates, transportation and communication facilities and other vital installation inside post.
    • Crowd control during civil disturbance and calamities.
    • Camp defense and security.
    • Investigate cases of petty crimes inside post such as illegal activities, violation of post rules and regulations, traffic accident and crimes against persons and properties.

     

    "Traffic Regulation, Parking and Camp Regulation"

    For any inquiries, please call or text

    MPBn, HHSG PA Hotline Numbers

    Trunkline 845-9555 Local 5043

    Mobile 
    0977-755-1730 (Globe)

    "WE CARE TO BE AWARE"
    Isumbong mo kay kay Commander
    For any inquiries, please call or text
    0998-471-4055 (Smart) 

    Message Us

    COL EDDIE M PILAPIL INF (GSC)PA
    COL EDDIE M PILAPIL INF (GSC)PACommanding Officer 191st MPBN, HHSG, PA

         The 191st Military Police Battalion is mandated to perform its mission to enforce military laws and orders to all military personnel working in the organization in order that the army is distinct from other group of people because of discipline, provide security to all local and foreign dignitaries, VIPs in and out the HPA complex and custodial management to all the detainees in support to the mission of HHSG, Philippine Army.

    HISTORY

                 The Military Police organization was able to write a long and remarkable history that could be traced as early as the 1930’s. And since it’s inception up to the 1970’s, the term Military police is synonymous to the Provost Marshall. As such, these can be no discussion about the Military police without discussing as well the Provost Marshal. Back then, the Provost Marshal is the most senior Military Police Officer of the Command.
    In 1936, the first Provost Marshal General was MGen Jose delos Reyes when the Constabulary became a division of the Philippine army while continuously discharging it’s normal police duties

    POST WAR
                The Military Police Command after the war is essentially a post-liberation version of the Philippine Constabulary whose time-honored name was still sullied by its unfortunate association with the Japanese Bureau of Constabulary. The Unit was trained under Military Police programs with the primary mission similar to the prewar Constabulary WITH JURISDICTION OVER THE CIVILIAN POPULACE to include the enforcement of the Military Law and Order.
                In 1945, following the surrender of Japan, Military Police units existed in most places in the country as the only unit of the Armed Forces of the Philippine- most others having been deactivated. In Luzon, three Military Police Battalions were activated from the Philippine Army and were trained as MP units distinctive from the Military Police Command. These were then attached to US Army installations and bases. By 1953, a total of eight (8) MP units composed of:
                 Three (3) – Air Police Companies from the three (3) Philippine Air Forces bases.
                 Two (2) – Area MP Companies of the First and Second Military Areas
                 One (1) – MP section of GHQ, AFP
                 303rd MP Company and 202nd MP Company of the Philippine Army.
                 Were already organized and existing-all without upper level guidance, uncoordinated in their activities and hampered by lack of doctrine and serious personnel problems.
                In 1954, The 303rd MP Company was attached to the Officer of the Provost Marshal and was commanded by the Provost Marshal General, AFP with jurisdiction over Manila area while the MP units of the major services limited in their activities within the posts.

    MARSHAL LAW ERA
                      The Martial Law years ushered the creation of composite Military Police Battalion, AFP was organized in 1973 with jurisdiction over Greater Manila area. A year after, the creation of the 2nd Composite Military Police Battalion, AFP with jurisdiction over Zamboanga City, Cebu City and Jolo followed.
                      In 1975, the Composite MP Brigade, AFP was organized to control the two Composite MP Battalions and was headed by ---, The Provost Marshal General, AFP.

    1980'S ONWARDS
                The 202nd MP Command was previously based at the concessionaire area of the old Fort Bonifacio. They were jokingly called “Pulis Paranaque” due to the vast area being covered from the former Fort Bonifacio Gate 1 in Brgy CEMBO, Makati City to Gate 3 at vicinity Bonifacio Naval Staion.
                After the 1989 coup d’etat, the unit was dissolved and eventually became the provisional unit 909th MP Company and the 08th Custodial Company to GO Nr 312 HPA dated 16 June 1990.
                In 1991, pursuant to GO Nr 511 HPA dated 16 June 909th MP Company and the 808th Custodial Company were merged into a regular unit called the Military Police Battalion. They were then based at the current Division Admin Detachment site war Southern Police District and covering the areas from old St. Ignatius Chapel, Makati City to old Gate 3, of the Philippine Navy of the Fort Bonifacio Complex.
                By 1998, the unit was then renamed 191st Military Battalion, HHSG, PA pursuant to para 2 GO Nr 654 HPa dated 15 June 1998. The unit transferred its headquarters at vicinity of the current Security and escort Battalion on 1999 with jurisdiction over the 103 Hectares Retention Area of the fort Bonifacio.
                Today, there exists a total of one (1) Battalion, 3 companies and 6 (based on size) platoons of MP units within the Philippine Army and just like in 1953, they remain to be uncoordinated in their activities and hampered by lack of doctrine.

    HISTORY OF THE LANYARD

                The most distinct part of the Military Police unit is the lanyard or simply the white cord, which identifies the Military Police from other soldiers from a distance. Its history and known origin is as diverse as the colorful history of the Military Police.

                The origin of the white lanyard has its practical beginning, significant function, and legend as well. The practical use of the lanyard is to secure the most important parts of the Military Police uniform, the whistle and the pistol. The whistle being used as of today is far different from the original traditionally used in lanyards, its practical use to secure the pistol never changed. It is customary, by virtue of tradition, that only officers or persons with authority have the right to carry a pistol that is secured by a lanyard from being lost. The lanyard practically became associated to people with authority.

                The significant use the lanyard as a significant symbol of authority first came to be known when Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte first used the lanyard as a ceremonial part of a royal uniform when he came to power in France. The lanyard attained a significant symbol of authority, thus the color and material also indicated power. From a simple fiber material, gold and gold like material became a must to indicate the importance of the person using such lanyard.

                On the other hand, the lanyard also bears a bloody and horrible symbol of great responsibility when naval personnel protecting admirals used the lanyard as a reminder of their great responsibility. The lanyard and its significant length tied around the shoulders of the persons protecting the admiral reminds them that the same lanyard will be used to hang them if any evil will befell upon the life of the admiral they are protecting.

                Even the position of the lanyard at the shoulders of the aide-camps indicates either the person they are serving is a civilian occupying high positions or military generals. Lanyards on the left shoulders indicates that the aide is serving a high ranking civilian while lanyards worn on the right shoulder indicates that the person being protected is a general of the army or an admiral in a naval force. The only thing that remained ornamental with the lanyard is the naval whistle attached to its end minus the pistol.

                Legend of Greek origin also indicates that the lanyard is also a symbol of pride, honor, and courage. It is said that when the Greek city states were being attacked by Persians, there was a Greek race that always run away from battle. In order to distinguish and identify the coward race, they were ordered by the king to wear a white dull cord similar to a lanyard. The said cord became a symbol of cowardly conduct until one day because of shame; the said race did its best and fought a bloody battle at Marathon against the Persians. The Greek king ordered the   removal of the cord but it is said that the coward Greek race requested that the cord to remain and instead a knife be attached to its end. As a reward the king allowed them to wear the cord as a reminder of such courageous act while the knife will be used to end their life if they should fail to protect their king and honor. The cord that was once a symbol of being a coward became a symbol of honor and courage.

                The lanyard’s color white symbolizes purity and neutrality. Clean and unblemished, the white lanyard/ cord symbolized impartiality and fairness in dealing with people. Even from a far, the white lanyard indicates pure intention.

                The Philippine Army’s Military Police use of the white lanyard indicates the great responsibility to protecting, serving, and defending the institution they swore to protect. The white lanyard reminds every MP’s to remain faithful to their sworn duty of protecting the Army, defending the institution, and serving the people. Attached to such lanyard is the symbol of his authority the pistol.

                The symbolic, traditional, and practical use of the lanyard indicated that it became an indispensable reminder to every Military Police wearing it the crucial duty of protecting the Army and the people as its mandate. The lanyard is a reminder that the failure to perform one’s duty means the loss of one’s honor, life, and the very essence of its existence-duty.


    UNIT SEAL/LOGO & COLOR SYMBOLISM

    Majestic Philippine Eagle Overseeing - a fortress symbolizing the command and leadership of the Philippine Army

    MP’s might of power and authority - represented by its common weapon the Cal. 45 pistol and handcuffs 

    The Three Star - represent the MP’s responsibilities over the AFP’s branch of service and its deployment across the archipelago

     


     

    MISSION
    To conduct security and render military honors in support to HHSG mission.

    VISION

    To become a better, more responsive, more dynamic, more capable and more professional law enforcement unit of the Philippine Army.

    FUNCTIONAL AREAS

    • Area Security and Operations (Base Defense, Force Protection, VIP Protective Detail, etc.)
    • Maneuver and Mobility Support Operations (Convoys Escorts, etc.)
    • Law and Order Operations (Law Enforcement, Traffic Control Management, Investigations, etc.)
    • Internment and Resettlement Operations (Custodial Management, POW Handling, Refugees Resettlement, etc.)
    • Police Intelligence Operations Terrorism and Anti-Crimes and Liaising with other Law Enforcement Agencies


    UNIT CAPABILITIES

    • Provide security to all vital installations, facilities, high-profile personnel and critical assets of the philippine army.
    • Conduct military operations in urban terrain (mout) for base defense operation.
    • Enforce military laws, post rules and regulation, maintain order, discipline inside post.
    • Traffic control and management inside post.
    • Military police operations (intelligence & investigation).
    • Provide mobility support and route security during troop and supply movement.
    • Perform custodial supervision and confinement of military detainees.
    • Control stragglers and civilian refugees.assist in man-made or natural disaster relief operations.


    UNIT SPECIFIC TASK

    • Enforce military laws, post rules and regulations.
    • Control traffic and movement of individual inside post.
    • Physical security of camp gates, transportation and communication facilities and other vital installation inside post.
    • Crowd control during civil disturbance and calamities.
    • Camp defense and security.
    • Investigate cases of petty crimes inside post such as illegal activities, violation of post rules and regulations, traffic accident and crimes against persons and properties.

     

    "Traffic Regulation, Parking and Camp Regulation"

    For any inquiries, please call or text

    MPBn, HHSG PA Hotline Numbers

    Trunkline : 845-9555 Local 5043/5045
    MPBn      : 0917-891-1635 (Globe)

    "WE CARE TO BE AWARE"
    Isumbong mo kay kay Commander
    For any inquiries, please call or text
    0998-471-4055 (Smart) 

    Message Us

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